Archive for tag: Raoul Walsh

Me and My Gal

21 June, 2015 (09:59) | by Richard T. Jameson, Film Reviews, Raoul Walsh | By: Richard T. Jameson

[Originally published on Straight Shooting at Queen Anne News, September 30, 2012] Just a quick recommend, before it’s too late. One of my very favorite movies is making a rare TV appearance Monday, Oct. 1, at 5 p.m. West Coast time on Turner Classic Movies. To “very favorite” let me add an endorsement from an […]

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A Neglected Western: ‘Colorado Territory’

29 April, 2015 (05:38) | by Peter Hogue, Essays, Film Reviews, Raoul Walsh, Westerns | By: Peter Hogue

[Originally published in Movietone News 45, November 1975] Colorado Territory, a remake of the High Sierra plot, is an early masterpiece of the pessimistic Western. It retains the High Sierra story and works variations on most of that film’s characters. But some significant changes are also made and the result, on the whole, is much […]

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‘He’s from back home’: Man and Myth in ‘High Sierra’

27 April, 2015 (05:26) | by Rick Hermann, Essays, Film Reviews, Raoul Walsh, Westerns | By: Rick Hermann

[Originally published in Movietone News 45, November 1975] One of the most memorable scenes in High Sierra takes place when Roy Earle (Humphrey Bogart) is driving towards Camp Shaw high in the mountains of California after being released from prison. The camera sweeps the Sierra peaks and pans down to Earle’s car as he pauses […]

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“That’s the kind of hairpin I am”: ‘Gentleman Jim’ and ‘The Strawberry Blonde’

22 April, 2015 (05:16) | by Peter Hogue, Essays, Raoul Walsh | By: Peter Hogue

[Originally published in Movietone News 45, November 1975] In Gentleman Jim a basic premise of the humor is that a good face-to-face brawl is one of the things that make life worth living. Here the physical and the sensual are a good deal less destructive than in White Heat and a good deal more pervasive […]

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Boys at Work: ‘They Drive by Night’ and ‘Manpower’

20 April, 2015 (05:35) | by Peter Hogue, Essays, Film Reviews, Raoul Walsh | By: Editor

[Originally published in Movietone News 45, November 1975] They Drive by Night and Manpower gave Walsh some contact with another Warners specialty, the workingman picture. Both films tell us something about the conditions under which their respective kinds of work, commercial trucking and powerline repair, are conducted. Walsh, characteristically, puts greater emphasis on comedy than […]

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Big Shots: ‘The Roaring Twenties,’ ‘High Sierra,’ ‘White Heat’

15 April, 2015 (05:07) | by Peter Hogue, Essays, Film Reviews, Raoul Walsh | By: Peter Hogue

[Originally published in Movietone News 45, November 1975] While The Roaring Twenties is hardly a definitive history of an era, its chronicle of the intersecting careers of Eddie Bartlett (James Cagney) and two buddies from the Great War has a sharp bite socially and more than a touch of tragic vision. Here as elsewhere, the […]

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Roughhouse Comedy: ‘The Cock-eyed World,’ ‘Me and My Gal,’ ‘The Bowery’

13 April, 2015 (05:01) | by Peter Hogue, Essays, Film Reviews, Raoul Walsh | By: Peter Hogue

[Originally published in Movietone News 45, November 1975] The Cock-eyed World is a plodding, heavyhanded and rather entertaining sequel, with sound, to What Price Glory?. The Flagg-Quirt stuff is less than thrilling, partly because of Edmund Lowe’s mismatched assets and liabilities, partly because the repartee keeps reverting to the “Aw—sez you” tack. But there’s a […]

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Two Raucous Silents: ‘What Price Glory?,’ ‘Sadie Thompson’

8 April, 2015 (08:14) | by Peter Hogue, Essays, Raoul Walsh, Silent Cinema | By: Peter Hogue

[Originally published in Movietone News 45, November 1975] What Price Glory?, like the successful play from which it is drawn, works with some of the era’s anger is directed less toward war itself than toward some of the era’s topical themes—in particular, as the title implies, the disillusionment that had befallen many of the youthful […]

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Raoul Walsh by Peter Hogue: Revisiting Raoul (Walsh)

6 April, 2015 (10:00) | by Peter Hogue, Essays, Raoul Walsh | By: Peter Hogue

My contributions to MTN#45 (the “Raoul Walsh issue”) were riding the crest of what was, at the time, my freshly discovered enthusiasm for Warner Brothers films of the Thirties and Forties, including especially William A. Wellman’s pictures from the pre-Code era, Raoul Walsh’s films from some of the best years of his career (1939-1949), and almost anything with James […]

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Raoul Walsh by Peter Hogue (1974)

6 April, 2015 (09:52) | by Peter Hogue, Essays, Raoul Walsh | By: Peter Hogue

[Originally published in Movietone News 45, November 1975] Interviewer: One critic, Andrew Sarris, has said, “The Walshian hero is less interested in the why or the how than in the what. He is always plunging into the unknown, and he is never too sure what he will find there.” Do you feel that’s too precious […]

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Blu-ray/DVD: Ben Affleck’s ‘Argo’ and the silent spectacle of ‘The Thief of Bagdad’

20 February, 2013 (08:14) | Blu-ray, by Sean Axmaker, DVD, Film Reviews, Raoul Walsh | By: Sean Axmaker

Argo (Warner), the third feature from actor-turned-director Ben Affleck, was released early in October, just before the traditional roll-out of high-toned dramas and Oscar-bait showpieces gets aggressively competitive, and debuted to glowing reviews, enthusiastic audiences, and impressive box-office. Pretty good for a real-life drama about the stranger-than-fiction rescue of the six Americans who escaped capture when Iranians stormed […]

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“The World in His Arms” – Gregory Peck Goes North to Alaska

6 April, 2011 (15:02) | by Sean Axmaker, DVD, Film Reviews, Raoul Walsh | By: Sean Axmaker

In the 1952 adventure The World In His Arms, Gregory Peck is a boisterous sea captain in the Pacific Coast, circa 1850, who has a plan to buy Alaska from the Russians… if they don’t kill him first. It’s not the kind of role that we immediately associate with Peck. He’s the man of principle, […]

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“The Man I Love,” “Road House” and Ida Lupino: The Noir Heroine

18 February, 2011 (10:15) | Actors, by Sean Axmaker, Film Noir, Film Reviews, Raoul Walsh | By: Sean Axmaker

If Barbara Stanwyck was the Queen B of film noir (as she was dubbed in an iconic issue of Film Comment), Ida Lupino was its tough cookie, a beauty with brass and a dame who knew the score. She was a romantic heroine who could hold her own against the brawny heroes and rough villains […]

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