Archive for category: Wim Wenders

Alice in the Cites

2 October, 2010 (11:18) | by David Coursen, Film Reviews, Wim Wenders | By: David Coursen

[Originally published in the Oregon Daily Emerald on December 1, 1977] After a striking opening shot—partially reversed at the end of the film—Alice In The Cities (1974) introduces a solitary figure, forlornly sitting on sand, his back against a post, self-descriptively singing, “under the boardwalk, down by the sea, on a blanket with my baby, […]

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Paris, Texas on Criterion

29 September, 2010 (07:52) | Blu-ray, by Sean Axmaker, DVD, Film Reviews, Wim Wenders | By: Sean Axmaker

Winner of the Palme D’Or at the 1984 Cannes Film Festival, Paris, Texas (Criterion) was not Wim Wenders’ first American film—that would be Hammett (1982), which proved to be a dispiriting experience when producer Francis Ford Coppola decided to step in and re-edit Wenders’ vision to something more commercial (so much for the creative freedom […]

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Road Movie to the Soul: The Cinematic Journeys of Wim Wenders

27 September, 2010 (17:22) | by Sean Axmaker, Essays, Wim Wenders | By: Sean Axmaker

[Extended version of an essay originally published in the Scarecrow Video “A Tribute to Wim Wenders” program in 1996.] “A lot of my films start off with road maps instead of scripts.” – Wim Wenders In Wenders’ student short Alabama (2000 Light Years) we first see what will become a hallmark in feature after feature: […]

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“At Home on the Road” – Wim Wenders Interviewed

26 September, 2010 (16:47) | by Judith M. Kass, Interviews, Wim Wenders | By: Judith M. Kass

[Originally published in Movietone News 57, February 1978] September 30, 1976 Could you tell me what Kings of the Road is about and how you came to make it? It’s a film about two men and they’re making a journey across, along the border of East Germany from the North to the South, which is […]

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