Archive for category: Sam Peckinpah

Videodrone Classic: ‘Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia’

3 April, 2014 (08:38) | Blu-ray, by Sean Axmaker, Film Reviews, Sam Peckinpah | By: Sean Axmaker

Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia (Twilight Time, Blu-Ray), one of Sam Peckinpah’s personal favorites of his films (and the rare Peckinpah film not to get reworked by the studio), opens on an idyllic river scene with a pregnant girl soaking her feet in the lazy current with a beatific smile on her face. […]

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The Beautiful and the Damned: Major Dundee

23 April, 2013 (06:00) | by Richard T. Jameson, Film Reviews, Sam Peckinpah | By: Richard T. Jameson

Sam Peckinpah’s much-messed-with 1965 film Major Dundee has just come out on Blu-ray from the boutique label Twilight Time. The two-disc set features both the 2005 reissue based on a preview version of the movie and the version released theatrically 48 years ago. Both are worth having, as the following Queen Anne & Magnolia News […]

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Review: Cross of Iron

4 July, 2011 (14:38) | by Robert C. Cumbow, Film Reviews, Sam Peckinpah | By: Robert C. Cumbow

[Originally published in Movietone News 54, June 1977] War is an inescapably personal experience in Cross of Iron. Nearly always from middle-shot or closer, the soldiers see the enemy they fight: many die in the embraces of their killers. No field-size moving masses of men, no distant artillery, no “targets” and “objectives.” In Peckinpah’s war […]

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Sam Peckinpah on DVD: A Guide to Resources

3 July, 2010 (11:59) | by Sean Axmaker, DVD, Sam Peckinpah | By: Sean Axmaker

You’ve read the essays, now see the films. My post-script to the Sam Peckinpah series is a survey of Peckinpah on DVD and Blu-ray, with notes on print and mastering quality and details on supplements (where applicable). And with so many of Peckinpah’s films released in compromised versions and later reconstructed or amended with restored […]

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Lost “Weekend”

2 July, 2010 (06:58) | by Richard T. Jameson, Essays, Sam Peckinpah | By: Richard T. Jameson

[Originally published in Film Comment Volume 20 Number 2, March-April 1984] Mandeville Canyon is a quiet, curvy stretch of road a good ten miles from Hollywood, lined with well-appointed homes generously separated by shrub and woodland. Where the grade begins to increase, as if the road aspired to eventually climbing out of the surrounding high […]

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Review: Convoy

1 July, 2010 (20:59) | by Richard T. Jameson, Film Reviews, Sam Peckinpah | By: Richard T. Jameson

[Originally published in Movietone News 58-59, August, 1978] Convoy continues Peckinpah’s voyage into “nihilist poetry,” in the phrase of Pauline Kael, which began to be dreamily insistent in The Killer Elite and became the whole show in Cross of Iron. At a glance, the new film looks closer to conventional narrative than that Yugoslav-based war […]

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Cross Of Iron: On getting past the blood

19 May, 2010 (05:25) | by Richard T. Jameson, Film Reviews, Sam Peckinpah | By: Richard T. Jameson

[Originally published in The Weekly (Seattle), May 25, 1977] Hugging the wall of a trench, Steyner’s platoon looks up at a Russian tank clattering over their heads. They are the last Germans at this easternmost point on the Russian front, a rear guard where no rear guard was meant to be, deliberately stranded and now […]

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Review: The Killer Elite

17 May, 2010 (05:21) | by Robert C. Cumbow, Film Reviews, Sam Peckinpah | By: Robert C. Cumbow

[Originally published in Movietone News 50, June 1976] Sam Peckinpah’s newest film opens with a whirling drill bit boring through a wall. But, whether by design or accident, The Killer Elite is not the study of espionage screwings and counter-screwings it might have been. In fact, for all its action, it is essentially a talk […]

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Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia

16 May, 2010 (09:15) | by Kathleen Murphy, Essays, Film Reviews, Sam Peckinpah | By: Kathleen Murphy

[originally published in The Austin Chronicle, October 22, 1999] Nowadays, most movies look factory-made, mechanically repeating cast, storyline, or F/X from the last big blockbuster. They touch us skin-deep, ask nothing of us but box-office, kill time and vanish. In contrast, Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia is like getting accosted by a wild-eyed […]

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Peckinpah Doesn’t Sing Along

14 May, 2010 (10:34) | by David Coursen, Essays, Sam Peckinpah | By: David Coursen

Sam Peckinpah, arguably the foremost American director to emerge during the sixties, developed—not to say cultivated—a persona that made his name virtually synonymous with “excessive screen violence.” While the accent was often placed on the noun, the first adjective also fit: Peckinpah was a man of appetites—the Randolph Scott character in Ride The High Country […]

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Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia

13 May, 2010 (09:08) | by Kathleen Murphy, by Richard T. Jameson, Essays, Film Reviews, Sam Peckinpah | By: Richard T. Jameson

[Originally published in Film Comment Volume 17 Number 1, January/February 1981] “Ah know you. You’re the guy in the hole.” —Gold Hat to Fred C. Dobbs, The Treasure of the Sierra Madre Toward the end of Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid, just before his self-shattering execution of Kris Kristofferson’s Billy, James Coburn as Pat […]

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Review: Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid

12 May, 2010 (09:13) | by Richard T. Jameson, Film Reviews, Sam Peckinpah | By: Richard T. Jameson

[Originally published in Movietone News 23, May-June 1973] Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid vies with The Ballad of Cable Hogue as Sam Peckinpah’s most personal film. Not that Ride the High Country, Major Dundee, The Wild Bunch, Straw Dogs, Junior Bonner, The Getaway, or even that compromised early project The Deadly Companions could have […]

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‘Tough ole hide’: The Getaway

10 May, 2010 (02:17) | by David Willingham, Essays, Film Reviews, Sam Peckinpah | By: David Willingham

[Originally published in Movietone News 23, May-June 1973] In The Getaway director Sam Peckinpah has crafted one of the tightest, cleanest, most physically compelling films to tweak your fancy in a long while. Harrumph, you say? Go soak your head in Kael, I say. Better yet, truck on out to one of the nabes and […]

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The Ballad of Cable Hogue and Jr. Bonner: Another Side of Sam Peckinpah

8 May, 2010 (10:23) | by Rick Hermann, Essays, Sam Peckinpah | By: Rick Hermann

[Originally published in Movietone News 52, October 1976] At a basic level, Peckinpah’s is a cinema of oppositions. When one thinks of Westerns, a genre whose configurations and conventions Peckinpah has done a lot to redefine, one tends to reduce moral tensions to a simple antagonism between forces good and evil—something Peckinpah’s films emphatically don’t […]

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The Ballad Of David Sumner: A Peckinpah Psychodrama

3 May, 2010 (05:05) | by Kathleen Murphy, Essays, Film Reviews, Movie Controversies, Sam Peckinpah | By: Kathleen Murphy

[Originally published in Movietone News 10, January 1972] Sam Peckinpah’s Straw Dogs reminds us that in our rush to civilization, we too often deny the violent origins of our favorite myths and rituals—and pretend that the primal power of our lizard brains never was. Who wants to recall that Christian Communion is a sanitized version […]

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