Archive for category: Kathryn Bigelow

The Way You Don’t Die: The Hurt Locker

5 February, 2010 (00:05) | by Sean Axmaker, Film Reviews, Kathryn Bigelow | By: Sean Axmaker

[expanded from a review originally published on seanax.com, July 2009] “Tell me something. What’s the best way to disarm one of these things?” “The way you don’t die, sir.” Set in the current Iraq war, after the proclamation of “Mission Accomplished” and the transformation of a battlefield army into an occupation force, The Hurt Locker […]

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True Fiction: Kathryn Bigelow on ‘The Hurt Locker’

4 February, 2010 (01:08) | by Sean Axmaker, Interviews, Kathryn Bigelow | By: Sean Axmaker

The Hurt Locker premiered in the one-two punch of the Venice Film Festival and the Toronto International Film Festival in the fall of 2008 and then made the long march through subsequent film festivals until its theatrical release in June 2009. Director Kathryn Bigelow shepherded the film through each showing, giving interviews every step of […]

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Black Arts

2 February, 2010 (07:01) | by Kathleen Murphy, Essays, Kathryn Bigelow | By: Kathleen Murphy

[originally published in Film Comment Volume 31, Number 5, September/October 1995] Kathryn Bigelow’s 1987 genre-juicing vampire film Near Dark opens close up on a leggy mosquito poised to tap into screen-spanning flesh. Apt epigraph for a film about heartland bloodsuckers; but also your ticket into any of the intensely sensual, romantically nihilistic excursions—The Loveless, Blue […]

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The Loveless Worlds of Kathryn Bigelow

1 February, 2010 (05:55) | by Robert C. Cumbow, Essays, Kathryn Bigelow | By: Robert C. Cumbow

First things first: We’re not jumping on the Bigelow Bandwagon here. We’ve known from the beginning. We saw the promise in The Loveless and Blue Steel and the genius in Near Dark and Strange Days, defended Point Break and K-19: The Widowmaker against detractors who saw them as nothing more than shallow pandering to the […]

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