Archive for category: Directors

Big Shots: ‘The Roaring Twenties,’ ‘High Sierra,’ ‘White Heat’

15 April, 2015 (05:07) | by Peter Hogue, Essays, Film Reviews, Raoul Walsh | By: Peter Hogue

[Originally published in Movietone News 45, November 1975] While The Roaring Twenties is hardly a definitive history of an era, its chronicle of the intersecting careers of Eddie Bartlett (James Cagney) and two buddies from the Great War has a sharp bite socially and more than a touch of tragic vision. Here as elsewhere, the […]

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Roughhouse Comedy: ‘The Cock-eyed World,’ ‘Me and My Gal,’ ‘The Bowery’

13 April, 2015 (05:01) | by Peter Hogue, Essays, Film Reviews, Raoul Walsh | By: Peter Hogue

[Originally published in Movietone News 45, November 1975] The Cock-eyed World is a plodding, heavyhanded and rather entertaining sequel, with sound, to What Price Glory?. The Flagg-Quirt stuff is less than thrilling, partly because of Edmund Lowe’s mismatched assets and liabilities, partly because the repartee keeps reverting to the “Aw—sez you” tack. But there’s a […]

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Two Raucous Silents: ‘What Price Glory?,’ ‘Sadie Thompson’

8 April, 2015 (08:14) | by Peter Hogue, Essays, Raoul Walsh, Silent Cinema | By: Peter Hogue

[Originally published in Movietone News 45, November 1975] What Price Glory?, like the successful play from which it is drawn, works with some of the era’s anger is directed less toward war itself than toward some of the era’s topical themes—in particular, as the title implies, the disillusionment that had befallen many of the youthful […]

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Raoul Walsh by Peter Hogue: Revisiting Raoul (Walsh)

6 April, 2015 (10:00) | by Peter Hogue, Essays, Raoul Walsh | By: Peter Hogue

My contributions to MTN#45 (the “Raoul Walsh issue”) were riding the crest of what was, at the time, my freshly discovered enthusiasm for Warner Brothers films of the Thirties and Forties, including especially William A. Wellman’s pictures from the pre-Code era, Raoul Walsh’s films from some of the best years of his career (1939-1949), and almost anything with James […]

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Raoul Walsh by Peter Hogue (1974)

6 April, 2015 (09:52) | by Peter Hogue, Essays, Raoul Walsh | By: Peter Hogue

[Originally published in Movietone News 45, November 1975] Interviewer: One critic, Andrew Sarris, has said, “The Walshian hero is less interested in the why or the how than in the what. He is always plunging into the unknown, and he is never too sure what he will find there.” Do you feel that’s too precious […]

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In Black & White: gawlDurgnat

23 February, 2015 (09:16) | Alfred Hitchcock, Books, by Robert C. Cumbow | By: Robert C. Cumbow

[Originally published in Movietone News 44, September 1975] THE STRANGE CASE OF ALFRED HITCHCOCK, or The Plain Man’s Hitchcock. By Raymond Durgnat. MIT Press. 429 pages. $15.00. For me, Raymond Durgnat has become, over a period of years, The Man You Love to Disagree With. Not that he doesn’t often strike exactly home, or express […]

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People Who Need People – ‘To Have and Have Not’

2 February, 2015 (08:09) | by Richard T. Jameson, Essays, Film Reviews, Howard Hawks | By: Richard T. Jameson

[Originally published in Movietone News 40, April 1975] She brought the bottle to his room and then he took the bottle to her room and now she has brought it back to his room without anyone having had a drink so far. He cocks an eye at their mutual pretext and remarks, “This is getting […]

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Caliban in Bodega Bay

19 January, 2015 (05:37) | Alfred Hitchcock, by Robert C. Cumbow, Essays, Film Reviews, Horror | By: Robert C. Cumbow

[Originally published in Movietone News 41, May 1975] The birds have really made a mess of Bodega Bay. Smoke from a gasoline fire hangs heavy over the city; bodies lie in the streets: abandoned automobiles, smashed windows, and ripped woodwork are grim evidence that the human beings have not won this battle. With Mitch Brenner’s […]

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Videophiled Collection: ‘Stanley Kubrick: The Masterpiece Collection’

2 December, 2014 (23:24) | Blu-ray, by Sean Axmaker, Film Reviews, Stanley Kubrick | By: Editor

Stanley Kubrick: The Masterpiece Collection (Warner, Blu-ray) – There are no remastered editions or new-to-Blu-ray discs in this box set of eight Kubrick classics, from the 1962 Lolita to his final film, Eyes Wide Shut (1999), but this ten-disc set does include the previously-released supplements on each film plus it features two new-to-disc documentaries and […]

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John Ford Reprints the Legend

17 November, 2014 (05:20) | by David Coursen, Essays, John Ford | By: David Coursen

[Originally published in Movietone News 42, July 1975] John Ford was probably more conscious of the meaning of history than any other American director; in a sense, the evolution of his historical vision is the measure of his growth as an artist. This evident fact is often commented on but, surprisingly, almost invariably in only […]

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Orson Welles: The Enigmatic Independent

16 November, 2014 (17:11) | by Sean Axmaker, Essays, Orson Welles | By: Sean Axmaker

[Expanded from a piece originally published on Greencine in 2003] “And now I’m going to tell you a story about a scorpion. A scorpion wanted to cross a river, so he asked a frog to carry him. ‘No,’ said the frog. ‘No, thank you. If I let you on my back you may sting me, […]

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Videophiled: John Ford’s ‘My Darling Clementine’ on Criterion

14 October, 2014 (18:06) | Blu-ray, by Sean Axmaker, DVD, Film Reviews, John Ford, Westerns | By: Sean Axmaker

My Darling Clementine (Criterion, Blu-ray, DVD), John Ford’s sublime reinterpretation of the Wyatt Earp story and the Gunfight at OK Corral, rewrites history to become a mythic frontier legend and one of the most classically perfect westerns ever made. Henry Fonda plays a hard, serious Wyatt Earp leading a cattle drive west with his brothers […]

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Videophiled Classic: Sam Peckinpah’s ‘Noon Wine’

26 September, 2014 (09:25) | Blu-ray, by Sean Axmaker, Film Reviews, Sam Peckinpah | By: Editor

The Killer Elite / Noon Wine (1966) (Twilight Time, Blu-ray) – By even the most generous measure, The Killer Elite (1975) is one of Sam Peckinpah’s weakest film. Which, by Peckinpah standards, is still a cut above a great many films. He manages to get his own sensibility into the tale of black ops mercenaries […]

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Blu-ray: ‘The Big Red One’

24 September, 2014 (09:49) | Blu-ray, by Sean Axmaker, DVD, Film Reviews, Sam Fuller | By: Sean Axmaker

Director, writer, pulp fiction author, raconteur and all-around maverick character Samuel Fuller was as proud of his military service as any of his artistic accomplishments. Like hundreds of thousands of other Americans, he enlisted in the armed services after Pearl Harbor was bombed by the Japanese. He joined the infantry and, as a rifleman in […]

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Blu-ray: ‘Caught’

22 September, 2014 (10:06) | Blu-ray, by Sean Axmaker, Film Reviews, Max Ophuls | By: Sean Axmaker

The American films of German-born filmmaker Max Ophuls have never been as celebrated as his more overtly stylized and seductively romantic French films. That attitude is fed by a sense of ill-treatment by the studios. He dropped the “h” to become Max Opuls in the credits of his Hollywood movies, which can either be seen […]

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