Archive for category: by Peter Hogue

Movietone News contributor

Viridiana

30 June, 2015 (15:37) | by Peter Hogue, Essays | By: Peter Hogue

[Originally published in Movietone News 39, February 1975] Buñuel doesn’t try very hard to allay suspicions that the visible fetishistic oddments so abundant in his films are simply the byproducts of any number of peculiar fantasies and “private” obsessions in which the director is indulging himself to the exclusion of almost everyone else. But however […]

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Subida al cielo (Mexican Busride)

24 June, 2015 (15:46) | by Peter Hogue, Essays | By: Peter Hogue

[Originally published in Movietone News 39, February 1975] Even though it may initially seem one of the least impressive of Buñuel’s works, Subida al cielo (American title: Mexican Busride) is more than a footnote to his career. The story itself is simple and obvious enough. Oliviero, a young man in a relatively primitive village which […]

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How It Is

11 May, 2015 (04:32) | by Peter Hogue, Essays, Film Reviews, Howard Hawks | By: Peter Hogue

[Originally published in Movietone News 40, April 1975] Only Angels Have Wings is one of Hawks’s “male adventurer” films, but it is also one of his comedies—and is perhaps best understood as such. It’s comedy in the sense that it has its share of wisecracks and a hint of slapstick—but also, and more importantly, in […]

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A Neglected Western: ‘Colorado Territory’

29 April, 2015 (05:38) | by Peter Hogue, Essays, Film Reviews, Raoul Walsh, Westerns | By: Peter Hogue

[Originally published in Movietone News 45, November 1975] Colorado Territory, a remake of the High Sierra plot, is an early masterpiece of the pessimistic Western. It retains the High Sierra story and works variations on most of that film’s characters. But some significant changes are also made and the result, on the whole, is much […]

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“That’s the kind of hairpin I am”: ‘Gentleman Jim’ and ‘The Strawberry Blonde’

22 April, 2015 (05:16) | by Peter Hogue, Essays, Raoul Walsh | By: Peter Hogue

[Originally published in Movietone News 45, November 1975] In Gentleman Jim a basic premise of the humor is that a good face-to-face brawl is one of the things that make life worth living. Here the physical and the sensual are a good deal less destructive than in White Heat and a good deal more pervasive […]

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Boys at Work: ‘They Drive by Night’ and ‘Manpower’

20 April, 2015 (05:35) | by Peter Hogue, Essays, Film Reviews, Raoul Walsh | By: Editor

[Originally published in Movietone News 45, November 1975] They Drive by Night and Manpower gave Walsh some contact with another Warners specialty, the workingman picture. Both films tell us something about the conditions under which their respective kinds of work, commercial trucking and powerline repair, are conducted. Walsh, characteristically, puts greater emphasis on comedy than […]

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Big Shots: ‘The Roaring Twenties,’ ‘High Sierra,’ ‘White Heat’

15 April, 2015 (05:07) | by Peter Hogue, Essays, Film Reviews, Raoul Walsh | By: Peter Hogue

[Originally published in Movietone News 45, November 1975] While The Roaring Twenties is hardly a definitive history of an era, its chronicle of the intersecting careers of Eddie Bartlett (James Cagney) and two buddies from the Great War has a sharp bite socially and more than a touch of tragic vision. Here as elsewhere, the […]

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Jimmy the Gent

15 April, 2015 (05:00) | Actors, by Peter Hogue, Essays | By: Peter Hogue

[Originally published in Movietone News 31, April 1974] The American Film Institute tribute to James Cagney (CBS-TV, March 18) was enjoyable almost in spite of itself. Through a barrage of film clips and above all through the poise and presence of Cagney himself, the event somehow managed to keep the man’s best qualities in the […]

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Roughhouse Comedy: ‘The Cock-eyed World,’ ‘Me and My Gal,’ ‘The Bowery’

13 April, 2015 (05:01) | by Peter Hogue, Essays, Film Reviews, Raoul Walsh | By: Peter Hogue

[Originally published in Movietone News 45, November 1975] The Cock-eyed World is a plodding, heavyhanded and rather entertaining sequel, with sound, to What Price Glory?. The Flagg-Quirt stuff is less than thrilling, partly because of Edmund Lowe’s mismatched assets and liabilities, partly because the repartee keeps reverting to the “Aw—sez you” tack. But there’s a […]

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Two Raucous Silents: ‘What Price Glory?,’ ‘Sadie Thompson’

8 April, 2015 (08:14) | by Peter Hogue, Essays, Raoul Walsh, Silent Cinema | By: Peter Hogue

[Originally published in Movietone News 45, November 1975] What Price Glory?, like the successful play from which it is drawn, works with some of the era’s anger is directed less toward war itself than toward some of the era’s topical themes—in particular, as the title implies, the disillusionment that had befallen many of the youthful […]

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Raoul Walsh by Peter Hogue: Revisiting Raoul (Walsh)

6 April, 2015 (10:00) | by Peter Hogue, Essays, Raoul Walsh | By: Peter Hogue

My contributions to MTN#45 (the “Raoul Walsh issue”) were riding the crest of what was, at the time, my freshly discovered enthusiasm for Warner Brothers films of the Thirties and Forties, including especially William A. Wellman’s pictures from the pre-Code era, Raoul Walsh’s films from some of the best years of his career (1939-1949), and almost anything with James […]

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Raoul Walsh by Peter Hogue (1974)

6 April, 2015 (09:52) | by Peter Hogue, Essays, Raoul Walsh | By: Peter Hogue

[Originally published in Movietone News 45, November 1975] Interviewer: One critic, Andrew Sarris, has said, “The Walshian hero is less interested in the why or the how than in the what. He is always plunging into the unknown, and he is never too sure what he will find there.” Do you feel that’s too precious […]

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Love Among the Ruins: 1975 in Review

29 March, 2015 (12:55) | by Kathleen Murphy, by Peter Hogue, by Richard T. Jameson, by Richard Thompson, by Rick Hermann, by Robert C. Cumbow | By: Richard T. Jameson

[Originally published in Movietone News 47, January 1976] “We might pass this way again”—the line from the song recurs throughout Stations, Roger Hagan’s exquisite documentary that stood out at this year’s Motion Picture Seminar of the Northwest and later graced a Seattle Film Society showing of Antonioni’s Cronaca di un amore. I seem to be […]

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Review: The Phantom of the Paradise

27 October, 2014 (11:48) | by Peter Hogue, Film Reviews | By: Peter Hogue

[Originally published in Movietone News 43, September 1975] The Phantom of the Paradise is funny and entertaining. It’s best as a comedy grounded in rock culture and it’s somewhat less successful as a humorous horror film. Perhaps because rock music has a power that exceeds that of a routinely developed horror plot, there’s a skittish […]

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Out of Season: The 19th International San Francisco Film Festival – Take 1

1 September, 2014 (15:13) | by Peter Hogue, Film Festivals | By: Peter Hogue

[Originally published in Movietone News 46, December 1975] Beforehand, the 19th San Francisco Film Festival looked less than scintillating. The parts of it that I was able to see were, by most accounts, the best parts, and if that’s so, then the first impression was not entirely wrong. The 1975 edition of the festival wasn’t […]

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