Archive for category: by Jay Kuehner

‘We Are Mari Pepa': New Life for the Coming-of-Age Genre

18 August, 2014 (11:00) | by Jay Kuehner, Essays | By: Jay Kuehner

Deceptively sumptuous given its scruffy punk milieu, We Are Mari Pepa (Somos Mari Pepa) breathes unexpected life into the naturally jaded (but hormone-riddled) body of youth/skate/band/buddy flicks. Samuel Kishi Leopo’s debut is utterly faithful in its depiction of the torpor and hope that doggedly accompanies teenagers everywhere, while limning a distinctly Mexican portrait of Jalisciense […]

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Mystery, Acumen, Divination: On a few of the epiphanies and lulls of the last year

29 January, 2014 (09:53) | by Jay Kuehner, Essays | By: Jay Kuehner

Measuring films in calendar years and hierarchical lists feels a bit like ranking friends or, worse, rating relationships (Noah Baumbach’s Zagat history of a former romance rather drolly makes the point)—even if the impulse to canonize serves us well historically. And Godard did it. Now receding from view, 2013 may not have been revelatory in the […]

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Review: ‘Mouton’

13 January, 2014 (08:42) | by Jay Kuehner, Film Reviews | By: Jay Kuehner

Some mysteries aren’t meant to be solved, and Mouton (no, this isn’t another film about sheep) from first-time directors Gilles Deroo and Marianne Pistone, is the latest in a budding field of beautifully irreducible tales—blessed with the imprimatur of Locarno’s Opera Prima award—that refracts its subject through a prismatic approach to narrative. This shape-shifting is […]

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Parallax View’s Best of 2013

1 January, 2014 (11:58) | by Jay Kuehner, by Kathleen Murphy, by Richard T. Jameson, by Robert Horton, by Sean Axmaker, by Sheila Benson, lists | By: Sean Axmaker

Welcome 2014 with one last look back at the best releases of 2013, as seen by the contributors to Parallax View and a few notable Seattle-based film critics. Sean Axmaker 1. Her (Spike Jonze) 2. Blue is the Warmest Color / La vie d’Adèle (Abdellatif Kechiche) 3. Something in the Air / Apres Mai (Olivier […]

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Expansive Views at Telluride’s 40th

3 September, 2013 (08:32) | by Jay Kuehner, Film Festivals | By: Jay Kuehner

On the occasion of its 40th anniversary, Telluride, the venerable film festival tucked away in this remote Colorado mountain village bucked tradition and did the seemingly unthinkable: it expanded. Adding an extra day to its program and a new theater (a 500-seat beauty named in honor of Werner Herzog) to its venues, the festival could be […]

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Terror Incognita: Julia Loktev on The Loneliest Planet

30 June, 2012 (09:19) | by Jay Kuehner, Interviews | By: Jay Kuehner

Despite the elemental grandeur of its setting and the irony of its title, The Loneliest Planet (2011) hinges neither on the cruelty of nature nor of civilization, but on the betrayals endemic to interpersonal relationships. A deceptively minimal and decidedly haunted pastoral tour that follows a couple of affianced Americans trekking through the rugged beauty of Georgia’s […]

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BAFICI 14: Reviens Vite

5 June, 2012 (10:05) | by Jay Kuehner, Film Festivals | By: Sean Axmaker

There’s a certain poetic justice to the unxpected trajectory—provided by the 14th Buenos Aires Festival of Independent Cinema—of America’s preeminent film critic, who, having been recently laid off from his long-standing post (34 years!) at The Village Voice, now materialized at a festival symposium half a world away to discuss his labour of love. J. Hoberman was […]

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Watching Movies in the Mountains and Enjoying the ‘ride: the 2011 Telluride Film Festival

2 October, 2011 (08:05) | by Jay Kuehner, Film Reviews | By: Jay Kuehner

My arrival by car to the high altitude, low attitude Telluride Film Festival is understandably, even fittingly, late, given the fest’s relative proximity to the expansive, vermillion grandeur of Monument Valley, otherwise known as John Ford country. Loiter there, however, and you’re liable to miss the festival’s opening night rollout of Werner Herzog’s latest doc Into […]

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Spotlight: ‘Nana’

1 October, 2011 (11:03) | by Jay Kuehner, Film Festivals, Film Reviews | By: Jay Kuehner

Consider it a triumph of the medium that soon we may not speak of “in-between-ness” or indeterminacy in cinema (let alone “slow” or “contemplative”), such attributes having become subsumed by and substantive of film itself, commonly deployed to a point of sufficiency. In which case a film such as Valérie Massadian’s Nana, recently awarded the […]

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Exquisite Delay: The 54th San Francisco International Film Festival + Tindersticks perform Claire Denis film scores

4 June, 2011 (10:28) | by Jay Kuehner, Film Festivals | By: Jay Kuehner

While Cannes assumes its privileged position in the cinematic cosmos, the extant film world lurks in relative shadow, an eclisse that nonetheless calls attention to more modestly proportioned proceedings. Still flashy in its own west coast (relaxed) way, the recently wrapped San Francisco International Film Festival – 54 and counting! – soldiered on in relatively […]

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Parallax View’s Best of 2010

1 January, 2011 (05:20) | by Andrew Wright, by David Coursen, by Jay Kuehner, by John Hartl, by Kathleen Murphy, by Richard T. Jameson, by Robert Horton, by Sean Axmaker, Editor, lists | By: Sean Axmaker

Welcome 2011 with one last look back at the best releases of 2010, as seen by the contributors to Parallax View. Sean Axmaker 1. Carlos 2. Let Me In 3. The Social Network 4. White Material 5. Winter’s Bone 6. The Ghost Writer 7. Wild Grass 8. Eccentricities Of A Blond Haired Girl 9. Sweetgrass […]

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At His Own Pace: A Short Talk With Pedro Gonzalez-Rubio, director of “Alamar”

2 December, 2010 (16:45) | by Jay Kuehner, Interviews | By: Jay Kuehner

As for quiet revelations in cinema, witness the exemplary case of Alamar (d. Pedro González-Rubio), in which a beautiful Mayan fisherman in Mexico’s Banco Chinchorro reef gets temporary custody of his 5 year-old son Natan, born to an Italian mother, and together they fish, eat, play and take notice of the natural wonders around them. […]

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SIFF 2010: Like You Know It All

27 May, 2010 (15:50) | by Jay Kuehner, Film Festivals | By: Jay Kuehner

The Seattle International Film Festival is upon us again, that equally cherished and dreaded pre-summer ritual that entails queuing and going indoors just as the city is collectively preparing to spread its wings after another monochrome season of scarce daylight and, quite probably, enough drama already. Complain, however, that the fest is too long, and […]

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A Hole in the Heart of Man, Out At the Edge of the World: Some Remarks On the Cinema of Lisandro Alonso

16 November, 2009 (17:48) | by Jay Kuehner, Essays | By: Jay Kuehner

[Published in conjunction with NWFF's Hot Splice] “Why is manhood… an endless highway?” – Adam Zagajewski, Tierra del Fuego The NWFF is to be commended for presenting a rare coup: a cycle of films that taken together evince a dedicated and visionary artist at work, the Argentine director Lisandro Alonso. The devoted following that Alonso’s […]

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