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Video: Framing Pictures for June 2017

Film critics and Seattle film mavens Robert Horton, Richard T. Jameson, Kathleen Murphy and Bruce Reid discuss Wonder Woman, David Lynch’s return to the Pacific Northwest Gothic of Twin Peaks, and home video releases of two classics: Nicholas Ray’s They Live By Night and Sam Peckinpah’s The Ballad of Cable Hogue.

These discussions are held in the screening room of Scarecrow Video on the second Friday of every month and are free to attend. The Seattle Channel records and presents many of these a few weeks later on the Seattle Channel.

You can also watch it on the Seattle Channel website.

Keep up with the discussion at the Framing Pictures Facebook page.

SIFF 2017: It’s a wrap!

The Golden Space Needle Audience Awards were handed out for SIFF 2017 on Sunday, June 11, and soon after the Best of SIFF 2017 line-up was announced.

Parallax View has both covered for you here.

(You can also peruse reviews, interviews, and other features collected and curated in Parallax View’s SIFF 20187 Guide here.)

Rodrigo Grande’s Argentine crime thriller At the End of the Tunnel won the Golden Space Needle Audience Awards for Best Film and Best Director and Peter Bratt’s Dolores, a portrait of racial and labor activist Dolores Huerta, won for Best Documentary. Seattle audiences also awarded Sami Blood star Lene Cecilia Sparrok the Best Actress award and David Johns of I, Daniel Blake the Best Actor award.

Keep Reading

SIFFing: Parallax View’s SIFF 2017 Guide

The 43rd Annual Seattle International Film Festival opens on Thursday, May 18, with the opening night gala presentation of The Big Sick, from director Michael Showalter and writer/star Kumail Nanjiani, and closes 24 days later on Sunday, June 11 with the North American premiere of Raoul Peck’s The Young Karl Marx. In between there are (at last count) 161 feature films, 58 documentary features, 14 archival films, and 163 short films. All told: 400 films representing 80 countries (as of opening night).

Here is Parallax View’s coverage and guide to SIFF resources from around the web. We will update a few times a week.

SIFF Week by Week, Day by Day:

SIFF 2017: It’s a wrap! (Parallax View) NEW
The 13 Best Movies to See at SIFF This Weekend: June 9-11, 2017 (staff, The Stranger) NEW
Highlights of the film festival’s final weekend (staff, Seattle Times) NEW
Closing Weekend Picks (staff, The SunBreak) NEW
Homestretch Roundtable (The SunBreak) NEW
SIFF 2017: Week Four Preview (Sean Gilman, Seattle Screen Scene) NEW
Keep Reading

Video: Framing Pictures – April 2017

Film critics and Seattle film mavens Robert Horton, Richard T. Jameson, Kathleen Murphy and Bruce Reid discuss Raw, the first offering by French director Julia Docournau, and offer a master class on veteran filmmaker Walter Hill and his new thriller, The Assignment. Also, get to know Emily Dickinson in the Oscar contender A Quiet Passion.

These discussions are held in the screening room of Scarecrow Video on the second Friday of every month and are free to attend. The Seattle Channel records and presents many of these a few weeks later on the Seattle Channel.

You can also watch it on the Seattle Channel website.

Keep up with the discussion at the Framing Pictures Facebook page.

 

Video: Framing Pictures – February 2017

Film critics and Seattle film mavens Kathleen Murphy, Richard T. Jameson, and Robert Horton discuss the 2017 Oscar race in the February edition of Framing Pictures, just the thing to prepare for the presentation of the Academy Awards on Sunday, February 26.

These discussions are held in the screening room of Scarecrow Video on the second Friday of every month and are free to attend. The Seattle Channel records and presents many of these a few weeks later on the Seattle Channel.

You can also watch it on the Seattle Channel website.

Keep up with the discussion at the Framing Pictures Facebook page.

Parallax View’s Best of 2016

Welcome 2017 with one last look back at the best releases of 2016, as seen by the Parallax View contributors and friends and a few special invitations.

Sean Axmaker

1. Elle (Paul Verhoeven)
2. Cemetery of Splendor (Apichatpong Weerasethakul)
3. Manchester by the Sea (Kenneth Lonergan)
4. Hell or High Water (David Mackenzie)
5. Sully (Clint Eastwood)
6. The Handmaiden (Park Chan-wook)
7. Neruda (Pablo Larrain)
8. Paterson (Jim Jarmusch)
9. American Honey (Andrea Arnold)
10. Our Little Sister (Kore-eda Hirokazu)
Could have made the list on another day: Arrival, Don’t Think Twice, Hail, Caesar!, Jackie, La La Land, The Lobster, Love & Friendship, Moonlight, The Neon Demon, The Witch

Pure moviegoing joys of the year: Sing Street (John Carney), Hunt for the Wilderpeople (Taika Waititi)

Performance of the year: Isabelle Huppert in Elle

Worst film of the year (in a year when I managed to skip most of what everyone else has branded as terrible): Nocturnal Animals

Also a list at Village Voice, plus lists of Best Restorations / Revivals of 2016 and Best Blu-ray/DVD Releases of 2016

Sheila Benson

1. Moonlight
2. Paterson
3. Toni Erdmann
4. Manchester by the Sea
5. I, Daniel Blake
6. Elle
7. Loving
8. The Handmaiden
9. A Bigger Splash
10. Aferim!
Also a list at Village Voice

David Coursen

It includes only films screened in D.C in 2016. Numbers 5-7 were shown only once; the others had more extended runs.
1. Manchester by the Sea
2. Mountains May Depart
3. No Home Movie
4. Moonlight
5. The President
6. Sieranevada
7. Behemoth
8. Little Men
9. Remember
10. Sully
Honorable Mention: Mustang, Certain Women, The Handmaiden

No D.C. venue saw fit to screen the monumental Out 1: Noli me Tangere, so it’s not included. But even in the diminished format of a Netflix streaming and with all the ludicrous writhing and moaning, it’s such a grand and heroically ambitious muddle that I likely would have made it a rather incongruous neighbor of Moonlight.

John Hartl

Moonlight
Manchester by the Sea
Indignation
13th
Captain Fantastic
The Lobster
Hell or High Water
A Man Called Ove
The Innocents
La La Land
A second 10: Florence Foster Jenkins, A War, Love & Friendship, Family Fang, Take Me to the River, Arrival, Weiner, Southside With You, Snowden, Sparrows.

Robert Horton
(originally published in Seattle Weekly)

1. Aquarius
2. Our Little Sister
3. The Fits
4. Cemetery of Splendor
5. Things to Come
6. Everybody Wants Some!!
7. Sully
8. Paterson
9. Green Room
10. Aferim!
Runner-ups: My Golden Days, The Lobster, American Honey, Les Cowboys, Certain Women, Disorder, Manchester by the Sea, Moonlight, The Love Witch, Love & Friendship.

Richard T. Jameson

I have some key 2016 releases to catch up on, so this alphabetical listing simply celebrates ten films I liked a lot.
American Honey
Aquarius
Arrival
Cemetery of Splendor
Elle
Green Room
Hell or High Water
Manchester by the Sea
Paterson
Sully
Things to Come

Oh … that’s eleven.  OK, so it’s eleven.

Jay Kuehner
(originally published on IndieWire)

1. Toni Erdmann
2. Cemetery of Splendor
3. Aquarius
4. Kate Plays Christine
5. Neon Bull
6. Happy Hour
7. Right Now, Wrong Then
8. Homeland: Iraq Year Zero
9. Certain Women
10. Moonlight

Moira Macdonald
(originally published in The Seattle Times)

In alphabetical order:
Arrival
Fences
The Handmaiden
Hell or High Water
The Innocents
La La Land
Loving
Maggie’s Plan
Manchester by the Sea
Moonlight
Other movies I loved, any of which might have made the first list on a different day, were L’Attesa, Certain Women, Christine, Dark Horse, Don’t Think Twice, Finding Dory, Little Men, Love & Friendship, Our Little Sister, Southside With You, Tower.

Andrew Wright
(originally published in Salt Lake City Weekly)

1. Paths of the Soul
2. The Fits
3. Shin Godzilla
4. Elle
5. Hell or High Water
6. Green Room
7. The Witch
8. Tower
9. Manchester by the Sea
10. Arrival
Also a list at Seattle Screen Scene and links to reviews of select films here

Filmmakers

Megan Griffiths (director, Eden, Lucky Them, The Night Stalker)
(originally published in The Talkhouse)

1. Moonlight
2. American Honey
3. Tiny: The Life of Erin Blackwell
4. Uncle Kent 2
5. Free in Deed
6. 13th
7. Captain Fantastic
8. Manchester by the Sea
9. Lamb
10. The Lobster

John Jeffcoat (director, Bingo: The Movie, Outsourced, Big in Japan)

This is one bizarre list. It shows I have kids and I didn’t get out much in 2016! And that TV continues to stay strong (sorry I cheated with the TV shows).
Captain Fantastic
Deadpool
Storks (biggest surprise, I may have been drinking)
Doctor Strange
Cameraperson
Minimalism
Rogue One
Goliath
Silicon Valley
Stranger Things (my favorite)

Jennifer Roth (executive producer: The Wrestler, Black Swan, Laggies, Blood Father)

Alphabetical order because I kind of liked them all equally.
Certain Women
Gimme Danger
Green Room
Hell or High-water
I, Daniel Blake
Manchester by the Sea
Moonlight
Paterson
Sing Street
Weiner

Lynn Shelton (director, Humpday, Your Sister’s Sister, Laggies)

There were many films that I didn’t get a chance to see this past year so this list comes from a limited survey. That being said, I feel very strongly about every one of them.
Moonlight
13th
The Lobster
Victoria
Arrival
American Honey
Moana
Kubo and the Two Strings
Hell or High Water
Atlanta *
*this is not a movie, it is a TV show on FX, but it is so anti-television in its cadence and cinematography and writing that I felt a very strong urge to include it in this list.

Rick Stevenson (director, Magic in the Water, Expiration Date, The Millennials)

La La Land
Captain Fantastic
Moonlight
Hell or High Water
Fences
Hidden Figures
Manchester by the Sea
Love & Friendship
The Lobster
Silence

Programmers

Beth Barrett (Interim Artistic Director, SIFF)
(originally published on IndieWire)

In no order, here are 10 works that really affected me in 2016:
Tower
La La Land
Stranger Things
Captain Fantastic
Moonlight
Tickled
Kedi
Midnight Special
Arrival
The Handmaiden
Every year I resolve to see more, champion more unknowns, and challenge myself more. Going into 2017, I resolve to make sure that the stories of the world keep getting seen.

Courtney Sheehan (Executive Director, Northwest Film Forum)
(originally published on Seattle Screen Scene)

1. Kaili Blues (Bi Gan)
2. Moonlight (Barry Jenkins)
3. Fire at Sea (Gianfranco Rosi)
4. A Rendering*
5. Los Sures (Diego Echeverria)
6. Right Now, Wrong Then (Hong Sangsoo)
7. Cameraperson (Kirsten Johnson)
8. No Home Movie (Chantal Akerman)
9. Crumbs (Miguel Llansó)
10. Tower (Keith Maitland)
Not yet released: Lily Lane, Ma, Rat Film, The ChallengeKino OtokThe Black PinMy Own Private WarStarless Dreams
Recalling 2015’s best unreleased films, all of which subsequently played Seattle in 2016 except for The EventAbove and BelowCemetery of SplendorMen Go to BattleUncle Kent 2, My Golden Days, A War, The Event
*The only short on this list, by LIMITS, or Seattle-based choreographer/dancer Corrie Befort and sound artist/musician Jason E. Anderson. Video shot and edited by Adam Diller.

More Seattle lists:

Mike Ward has been polling Seattle film critics for the Seattle Film Awards for a few years. The winners for 2016 will be announced in early January. UPDATE: Winners announced January 5.

Seattle Screen Scene invited film critics for their own compilation.

Polls / Lists

Village Voice
Time Out London
Slant
Sight and Sound / BFI
Roger Ebert.com
Indiewire
Film Comment

Other lists

2016 additions to the Library of Congress National Film Registry
Kristin Thompson and David Bordwell’s Ten Best Films of … 1926
A Year of Loss (David Hudson remembers those we lost in 2016)

Video: Framing Pictures – September 2016

Film critics and Seattle film mavens Richard T. Jameson, Bruce Reid, and Robert Horton discuss the new films Hell or High Water, Sully, and Disorder, and they pay tribute to late comic actor, screenwriter, director and novelist Gene Wilder (1933-2016), who passed away August.

These discussions are held in the screening room of Scarecrow Video on the second Friday of every month and are free to attend (note: there will be no September edition due to scheduling issues). The video appears a few weeks later on the Seattle Channel.

Keep up with the discussion at the Framing Pictures Facebook page.

Video: Framing Pictures – August 2016

Film critics Bruce Reid, Richard T. Jameson, and Robert Horton discuss the careers and legacies of actor Warren Oates and director Hector Babenco, praise Hirokazu Kore-Eda’s Our Little Sister (2016), and engage with Oscar Micheaux’s landmark race film Within Our Gates (1920) in the August 2016 edition of Framing Pictures, now available to stream via The Seattle Channel.

These discussions are held in the screening room of Scarecrow Video on the second Friday of every month and are free to attend. The video appears a few weeks later on the Seattle Channel.

The September edition will take place on Friday, September 9 at 7pm at the Scarecrow Video Screening Room. More information at the Framing Pictures Facebook page.

Video: Framing Pictures – July 2016

Film critics Bruce Reid, Richard T. Jameson, Kathleen Murphy, and Robert Horton debate and discuss the polarizing film The Neon Demon, the work of director Michael Cimino, and the unifying filmmaker Abbas Kiarostami in the July 2016 edition of Framing Pictures from Scarecrow Video.

These discussions are held in the screening room of Scarecrow Video on the second Friday of every month and are free to attend. The video appears a few weeks later on the Seattle Channel.

The August edition will take place on Friday, August 12 at 7pm at the Scarecrow Video Screening Room. More information at the Framing Pictures Facebook page.

Video: Framing Pictures – May 2016

Film critics Bruce Reid, Richard T. Jameson, Kathleen Murphy, and Robert Horton debate and discuss the recent restorations of film noir orphans Too Late for Tears and Woman on the Run, the legacy of Sam Peckinpah, Ben Wheatley’s new film High-Rise, and (non)critical opinions of Captain America: Civil War in the May 2016 edition of Framing Pictures from Scarecrow Video.

These discussions are held in the screening room of Scarecrow Video on the second Friday of every month and are free to attend. The video appears a few weeks later on the Seattle Channel.

The June edition will take place on Friday, June 10 at 7pm at the Scarecrow Video Screening Room. More information at the Framing Pictures Facebook page.

SIFFing: Parallax View’s SIFF 2016 Guide

The 42nd Annual Seattle International Film Festival opens on Thursday, May 19, with the opening night gala presentation of Woody Allen’s Café Society (in its North American premiere), and closes 24 days later on Sunday, June 12 with Jocelyn Moorhouse’s The Dressmaker. In between there are (at last count) 181 feature films, 75 documentary features, 8 archival films, and 153 short films. All told: 421 films representing 85 countries (as of opening night).

Here is Parallax View’s coverage and guide to SIFF resources from around the web. We will update a few times a week.

* Updated Sunday, June 12 *

SIFF Week by Week, Day by Day:

SIFF 2016: Audiences give ‘Captain Fantastic’ the Golden Space Needle Award (Sean Axmaker, Parallax View) NEW
Selections for the Fourth Week of the Seattle International Film Festival (Robert Horton, Seattle Weekly) NEW
SIFF 2016: Highlights of the final weekend (Moira Macdonald and John Hartl, Seattle Times) NEW
The 11 Best Films to See During SIFF’s Closing Weekend (staff, The Stranger) NEW
Recommended SIFF: Viggo, Viggo, Viggo AND Viggo! (Amie Simon, Three Imaginary Girls) NEW
SIFFtings 2016: Final Weekend (June 10-June 12) (Sean Axmaker, Parallax View) NEW
Some short SIFF reviews, part four (Chris Burlingame, The SunBreak) NEW
SIFF 2016: Picks for Centerpiece Weekend (June 3-June 5) (Tony Kay, The SunBreak)
Some short SIFF reviews, part 3 (June 1-June 7) (Chris Burlingame, The SunBreak)
Selections for the Third Week of the Seattle International Film Festival (Robert Horton, Seattle Weekly)
SIFF 2016: Highlights of week three (Moira Macdonald and John Hartl, Seattle Times)
SIFF 2016: Picks for Week Two (May 31-June 2) (The SunBreak)
SIFF 2016: Picks for Memorial Day Weekend (May 27-30) (The SunBreak)
Selections for the Second Week of SIFF
(Robert Horton, Seattle Weekly)
SIFF 2016: Highlights of week two (Moira Macdonald and John Hartl, Seattle Times)
The 26 Films You Should See at SIFF Over Memorial Day Weekend (staff, The Stranger)
SIFFtings 2016 Week 2 (May 27-June 2) (Sean Axmaker, Parallax View)
Some short SIFF reviews, part duex (May 25-May 31) (Chris Burlingame, The SunBreak)
SIFF 2016 Picks: Week One (May 23-May 30) (Seth Sommerfeld, Seattle Met)
Seattle Weekly’s SIFF Selections (Week 1) (Robert Horton, Seattle Weekly)
SIFF 2016: 17 Highlights of week one (Moira Macdonald and John Hartl, Seattle Times)
Some short SIFF reviews, part 1 (May 19-May 24) (Chris Burlingame, The SunBreak)
SIFFtings 2016 – Week One (Sean Axmaker, Parallax View)
SIFF 2016: Picks for Opening Weekend (The SunBreak)
SIFF 2016: Week One Highlights (Three Imaginary Girls)
Recommended SIFF: three picks for this weekend (Amie Simon, Three Imaginary Girls)

Spotlight Features and Commentary:

Lou Diamond Phillips embraces serial killer mentality for ‘The Night Stalker’ (Tom Tangney, MYNorthwest) NEW
Imaginary SIFF Interview: 5 questions with Lou Diamond Phillips (Amie Simon, Three Imaginary Girls) NEW
SIFF Sitdown: Q&A with Lou Diamond Phillips (Joe Veyera, Queen Anne & Magnolia News) NEW
SIFF Interview: The Mads are Back (Chris Burlingame, The SunBreak) NEW
Spencer Haywood (Tom Tangney, MYNorthwest)
SIFF interview: Behind the scenes with the Pistol Shrimps (Chris Burlingame, The SunBreak)
SIFF interview: Streetwise director Martin Bell (Chris Burlingame, The SunBreak)
Sam Choy’s Poke to the Max (Tiffany Ran, Northwest Asian Weekly)
Megan Griffiths: A fascination with ‘The Night Stalker’ (Sean Axmaker, Parallax View)
The frightening origins of director Megan Griffiths’ new film, premiering at SIFF (Moira Macdonald, Seattle Times)
Megan Griffiths Premieres ‘The Night Stalker’ at SIFF (Tony Kay, CityArts)
Imaginary SIFF Interview: Megan Griffiths (Amie Simon, Three Imaginary Girls)
SIFFX Dares Seattle to Get Real About Virtual Reality Right Now (Charles Mudede, The Stranger)
Interview – Xu Haofeng – The Final Master – SIFF 2016 (Tim Hall, Seattle PI)
Nick Terry’s ‘Finding October’ at SIFF (Tony Kay, CityArts)
Empathy Device: The first-ever SIFFX arrives
(Jonathan Zwickel, CityArts)
Reel Grrls puts SIFF and Woody Allen under the microscope (Daniel Nash, City Living Seattle)
SIFF Interview: If There’s a Hell Below director Nathan Williams (Chris Burlingame, The SunBreak)
Why SIFF should not be celebrating Woody Allen’s ‘Café Society’ (Nicole Brodeur, Seattle Times)
Portrait of a Survivor: Big Sonia (Tony Kaye, CityArts)
SIFF Interviews: Sonics legend Spencer Haywood (Chris Burlingame, The SunBreak)

Reviews and capsules:

SIFF 2016: Festival Roundtable (Week Two) (staff, The Sun Break) NEW
SIFF Face The Music 2016 Preview: We Are X (Janice Headley, KEXP) NEW
SIFF Face The Music 2016 Preview: Red Gringo (Janice Headley, KEXP) NEW
SIFF 2016: Festival Roundtable (Week One) (staff, The Sun Break)
At SIFF: A New High (Tony Kay, City Arts)
SIFF Take: Tag (Amie Simon, Three Imaginary Girls)
SIFF Face The Music 2016 Preview: The Austin City Limits Story (Masa, KEXP)
SIFF Face The Music 2016 Preview: Yo-Yo Man and the Silk Road Ensemble
(Janice Headley, KEXP)
SIFF Face The Music 2016 Preview: Contemporary Color (Janice Headley, KEXP)
SIFF 2016 Mini-Reviews: ‘Weiner,’ ‘ The Last King,’ ‘Tickled’ (David Chen, /Film)
NWAW at SIFF (staff, Northwest Asian Weekly)
17 Films You Must See at SIFF 2016 (Staff, The Stranger)
Tom’s top 10 picks for SIFF 2016 (Tom Tangney, MYNorthwest)
The Stranger Says (Staff, The Stranger)
7 great old films you can see at SIFF (Moira Macdonald, Seattle Times)
SIFF Face the Music 2016 Preview: Presenting Princess Shaw (Masa, KEXP)
SIFF Face The Music 2016 Preview: Concerto – A Beethoven Journey (Janice Headley, KEXP)
A film about eating bugs might be the best thing you see at SIFF this year (Bethany Jean Clements, Seattle Times)
The Stranger’s SIFF Notes (Staff, The Stranger)

Previews:

SIFFting Through SIFF (Robert Horton, Seattle Weekly)
SIFF 2016: Woody’s latest, Viggo Mortensen in person, and 421 movies (at last count) (Sean Axmaker, Parallax View)
SIFF 2016: The SIFF 42 Floodgates are Open (Tony Kaye, The SunBreak)
SIFF 2016 Preview: Face the Music (Amie Simon, Three Imaginary Girls)
SIFF 2016 Preview: Northwest Connections (Amie Simon, Three Imaginary Girls)
Seattle International Film Festival 2016: Face The Music (KEXP)
SIFF wants you to party all the time (party all the time, party all the time) (Amie Simon, Three Imaginary Girls)
Seattle International Film Festival (SIFF) Announces Rich African Pictures Program Lineup of Features and Shorts (Tambay A. Obenson, Indiewire)

How to SIFF:

How to make your way around SIFF 2016 (Moira Macdonald, Seattle Times)
SunBreak SIFF Pro Tips for 2016 (Tony Kaye, The SunBreak)

Official sites:

SIFF 2015 homepage
SIFF calendar
SIFF Films A to Z
SIFF 2015 Box Office
SIFFtv (video shorts and interviews from the festival)
Updates and schedule changes

And other resources:

The Stranger’s SIFF Notes
Three Imaginary Girls
The Sunbreak
City Arts
KEXP

A few blogs at SIFF

Should I See It?
Seattle Screen Scene
Den of Cinema
The Last Thing I See
A Classic Movie Blog

Schedule updates:

ADDED FILM AND TBA SLOTS ANNOUNCED!

NEW FILM:
The Love Witch – A modern-day witch uses spells and magic to get men to fall in love with her, in a vivid tribute to ’60s Technicolor thrillers.
(d: Anna Biller c: Samantha Robinson, Gian Keys, Laura Waddell, USA 2016, 120 min)
Screens Saturday June 11, 9:00pm, SIFF Cinema Uptown

BACK BY POPULAR DEMAND!
FRIDAY JUNE 10
The Night Stalker, 3:30pm, Pacific Place Cinemas
SUNDAY JUNE 12
SIFF Closing Night Gala The Dressmaker, 6:30pm, Pacific Place Cinemas
As You Are, 8:00pm, SIFF Cinema Uptown
The Pistol Shrimps, 9:00pm, SIFF Cinema Egyptian
Slash, 9:00pm, Pacific Place Cinemas

Video: Framing Pictures – April 2016

Richard T. Jameson, Bruce Reid, Kathleen Murphy, and Robert Horton sat down at the Scarecrow Video screening room on April 8, 2016 for the April edition of Framing Pictures. Over the course of the evening they discussed Cutter’s Way (newly released on Blu-ray; RTJ’s original review on Parallax View here) and declared Howard Hawks’ Only Angels Have Wings the greatest movie ever made.

The Seattle Channel was there to record the event. It is now showing on cable and streaming via their website. Or you can see it here.

Video: Framing Pictures – March 2016

Robert Horton, Richard T. Jameson, and Bruce Reid sat down at the Scarecrow Video screening room on March 11, 2016 to discuss talk Wim Wenders, Terrence Malick, and remember Vilmos Zsigmond (1930-2016), cinematographer on McCabe & Mrs. Miller, Close Encounters of the Third Kind, Seattle-shot favorite Cinderella Liberty, and more recently TV’s The Mindy Project, and French filmmaker Jacques Rivette.

The Seattle Channel was there to record the event. It is now showing on cable and streaming via their website. Or you can see it here.